• 301-589-7474 / 703-820-0804 

Welcome to American Eye Care Center

Eyes Are Windows To The World

Close your eyes and imagine you have not seen ever since the world and yourself. You will not have an idea with what it looks like when you only feel it. Eyes are very important for the human body. It helps the human body to do its tasks with coordination. Without it, a man won't be able to see the beauty of this wonderful world. Eyes are the windows of the soul. Without eyes, the five basic senses would not be complete. So, it should be present. 

At American Eye Care Center, our comprehensive American Eye Care Center practice provides a full range of services to help you attain the clearest vision possible. Using state-of-the-art techniques and equipment, we are focused on achieving and maintaining your optimum eye health.

Dr. Hameed U. Peracha , M.D. is a board-certified eye Physician and Surgeon offering comprehensive eye care, including:-

Cataract Refractive Surgery, ReSTOR® Lens, Glaucoma Treatment, Diabetic Eye Care, Comprehensive Eye Care, Pterygium, Glasses, TORIC Lens  

Call us today for more information or to make an appointment:  301-589-7474

Our Services

  • Cataract Refractive Surgery.

     

       

     The probe breaks up, or emulsifies the cloudy lens into tiny pieces and then suctions them out of the eye. Once the cloudy lens has been removed, a new artificial lens is implanted into the eye. This lens is known as an intraocular lens (IOL), and can often be inserted through the same incision that the old lens was removed from.There are several different IOLs available to help each patient achieve the best possible results from his/her cataract surgery. Multifocal IOLs allow for full vision correction at near, intermediate and far distances, completely eliminating the need for eyeglasses or contact lenses in most patients. Some IOLs can also correct astigmatism. These choices were not always available for cataract patients. In the past, cataract surgery only involved monofocal lenses, which could only focus on objects near or far, but could not adjust to accommodate varying distances. These patients still had to rely on glasses or contact lenses after surgery in order to see clearly at all distances.  This was especially problematic in older patients suffering from presbyopia, a loss of flexibility in the eye’s lens that causes nearby objects to look blurry.

    Patients can return home the very same day. Cataract surgery is done as an outpatient procedure in an operating room, so you don't have to stay in the hospital. The actual surgery usually lasts less than an hour. It is safe and in many ways desirable to be awake with some level of sedation during the surgery, but will need someone to drive them home. A sedative is given and numbing drops are placed on the eyes.

     

    Surgical Risk and Complications

    Although cataract surgery is considered safe, there are certain risks associated with any surgery. Some of these risks may include pain, infection, swelling and bleeding. However, most patients undergo this procedure without any complications.  Complications after cataract surgery are uncommon, and most can be treated successfully.Cataract surgery risks include:

    •             Inflammation

    •             Infection

    •             Bleeding

    •             Swelling

    •             Retinal detachment

    •             Glaucoma

    •             Secondary cataract

    •             Loss of vision

    Your risk of complications is greater if you have another eye disease or a serious medical condition affecting any part of your body. Occasionally, cataract surgery fails to improve vision because of underlying eye damage from other conditions, such as glaucoma or macular degeneration. If possible, it may be beneficial to evaluate and treat other eye problems before making the decision to have cataract surgery.

     Multifocal Intraocular Lens Implant

     

    The ReSTOR® lens improves upon the ordinary IOL by using anodized diffractive technology to provide a full range of focusing distances from near to far. A series of 12 gradual "step heights" of 0.2-1.3 microns each (thinner than a human hair and smaller than a red blood cell) in the center of the IOL create seamless focusing ability, while the peripheral refractive region helps to enhance distance vision. Apodization also allows the lens to work with the pupil to distribute light evenly in the eye in different lighting conditions and activity levels. Alcon® reports that up to 80 percent of patients who use the ReSTOR lens don't need glasses after surgery.

     
    Toric (Astigmatic) Intraocular Lens Implant

    Before Toric IOLs, people with astigmatism would need to undergo corneal refractive surgery after their lenses were implanted, or would remain dependent on glasses or contact lenses. The advanced Toric IOLs correct the imbalance caused by an irregular cornea shape in patients with astigmatism. There are several different types of FDA-approved Toric IOLs, including AcrySof® Toric Lenses, which can correct up to three diopters of astigmatism. Cataract lenses are used to correct vision problems during cataract surgery by replacing the old, damaged lens with an artificial lens that clears up and corrects vision, often leaving patients with little to no dependence on glasses. 

     

    While cataract surgery corrects cloudy lenses, it still leaves patients with astigmatism with distorted vision. Toric IOLs are specially designed to correct astigmatism along with overall vision during cataract surgery, offering complete vision correction.The risks of a Toric IOL include poor vision as a result of the lens rotating out of position, although this risk exists with any type of intraocular lens. Toric IOLs are considered safe for most patients with astigmatism and are the only solution to correct vision problems associated with both cataracts and astigmatism. Talk to your doctor to learn more about these lenses and find out if you can enjoy the benefits of Toric IOLs.

     

    To learn more about our Cataract Surgery, 
    Please Contact Us at (301) 589-7474 today to schedule an appointment.

  • Diabetic Eye Care.

     

    In the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, people on standard diabetes treatment got retinopathy four times as often as people who kept their blood sugar levels close to normal. In people who already had retinopathy, the condition progressed in the tight-control group only half as often. Patients with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing eye diseases that can lead to vision loss and blindness, such as diabetic retinopathy, cataracts and glaucoma. 

    In fact, diabetes is actually the leading cause of blindness in the United States. Diabetic eye conditions often develop without any noticeable vision loss or pain, so significant damage may already be done to the eye by the time patients notice any symptoms. For this reason, it is important for diabetic patients to have their eyes examined at least once a year. Early detection of eye disease can help prevent permanent damage.

    Diabetic-related eye problems develop from high blood sugar levels, which can cause damage to blood vessels in the eye. More than 40 percent of those with diabetes will develop some form of eye disease in their life. The risk of developing eye problems can be reduced through regular eye exams and by keeping blood sugar levels under control through a healthy diet and regular exercise.

     

    Facts About Diabetic Eye Diseases

    All forms of diabetic eye disease have the potential to cause severe vision loss and blindness.While diabetics struggle with a high sugar count in the blood along with insufficient insulin production, it is actually the lack of oxygen in the blood that causes eye problems and leads to vision loss.

    Diabetic retinopathy involves changes to retinal blood vessels that can cause them to bleed 

    or leak fluid, distorting vision .Diabetic eye conditions develop in the retina as a result of micro vascular abnormalities.The tiny blood vessels within the retina develop micro aneurysms and begin to leak blood. As new blood vessels develop, they also leak blood and can cause hemorrhages and permanent damage to the retina.

    Symptoms of Diabetic Eye Diseases

    The disease often progresses unnoticed until it affects vision. Bleeding from abnormal retinal blood vessels can cause the appearance of “floating” spots. These spots sometimes clear on their own. But without prompt treatment, bleeding often recurs, increasing the risk of permanent vision loss. If DME occurs, it can cause blurred vision.Diabetic eye conditions can be detected through a comprehensive eye exam.

     A comprehensive eye exam involves a visual acuity test to measure vision at various distances, and a dilated eye exam to examine the structures of the eye for any signs of disease. 

    During this test, your doctor can examine the retina and optic nerve with a special magnifying lens. Tonometry may also be performed during a comprehensive eye exam to measure the pressure inside the eye with a special instrument. Eye exams should be performed at least once a year or as soon as any potential problems are detected in order to ensure the early detection of any serious conditions. Early detection is the strongest protection against diabetic eye diseases.

     What is of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Diabetic retinopathy, the most common diabetic eye disease, occurs when blood vessels in the retina change. Sometimes these vessels swell and leak fluid or even close off completely. In other cases, abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina. It can also cause growth of abnormal new blood vessels on the surface of the retina. There are four stages of diabetic retinopathy that begin with the occurrence of micro aneurysms and eventually lead to 

     the presence of abnormal blood vessels on the surface of the retina  that can easily leak fluid and cause severe vision loss and even blindness.The fluid can also leak into the center of the macula and cause swelling and blurred vision, a condition known as macular edema.

    The risk of developing macular edema increases as diabetic retinopathy progresses. Diabetic retinopathy usually affects both eyes. People who have diabetic retinopathy often don't notice changes in their vision in the disease's early stages. But as it progresses, diabetic retinopathy usually causes vision loss that in many cases cannot be reversed. 

    Treatment of Diabetic Eye Conditions

    To make matters worse, a significant number of cases of diabetes and diabetic eye disease go undetected or untreated because people fail to have routine comprehensive eye exams as recommended by their optometrist or ophthalmologist.Treatment for early stages of diabetic retinopathy and other conditions usually focuses on maintaining levels of blood sugar, blood pressure and blood cholesterol, in order to prevent any permanent damage from occurring. For more advanced stages of the condition, laser surgery is often effective in shrinking the abnormal blood vessels through more than 1,000 laser burns in the area of the retina. This procedure, known as scatter laser treatment, usually requires two or more sessions in order to fully remove the blood vessels.

    Macular edema can also be treated through a laser procedure, called focal laser treatment, which places hundreds of laser burns in the area of retinal leakage to reduce the amount of fluid in the retina. This treatment only requires one session.Laser treatments can be performed in your doctor's office. Anesthetic eye drops will be used to minimize pain during the procedure. Patients may experience blurry vision for the remainder of the day, and should rest at home. It is important for patients to realize that these procedures cannot cure diabetic eye conditions, but rather help reduce vision loss and slow the progression for patients with more advanced cases. Most laser and non-laser treatments for diabetic eye disease depend on the severity of the eye changes and type of vision problems you have.

     

     

     

    To learn more about our Diabetic Eye Care, 
    please Contact Us at (301) 589-7474  today to schedule an appointment.

  • Glaucoma Medical/ Laser / Surgical Treatment

     

    The main objective in treating glaucoma is to lower intraocular pressure (or "IOP") in the eye. A lower IOP can reduce damage to the optic nerve and save your remaining vision.There are two main types of glaucoma, open-angle and angle-closure. Open-angle glaucoma is the most common type of glaucoma and involves fluid in the eye not draining properly through the trabecular meshwork. Angle-closure glaucoma involves a sudden buildup of pressure in the eye and poor drainage because the angle between the iris and the cornea is too narrow.

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness and visual impairment in the United States.  It can affect patients of all ages, many of whom do not experience any symptoms and may not be aware that they have the disease. 

     

    Glaucoma actually refers to a group of diseases that cause damage to the optic nerve as a result of increased pressure within the eye, but can also be caused by a severe eye infection, injury, blocked blood vessels or inflammatory conditions of the eye.

    Many patients do not experience any symptoms during the early stages of glaucoma, including no pain and no vision loss. This leaves most patients unaware that they even have the disease.

    Symptoms of Angle-Closure Glaucoma

    ·         Hazy or blurred vision.
    ·         The appearance of rainbow-colored circles around bright lights.
    ·         Severe eye and head pain.
    ·         Nausea or vomiting (accompanying severe eye pain)
    ·         Sudden sight loss.

     

    Treatment for Glaucoma

    Glaucoma eye drops often are the first choice over glaucoma surgery and can be very effective at controlling IOP to prevent eye damage. If you are a good candidate for glaucoma eye drops, you may be prescribed more than one type to achieve the best IOP control. In fact, many types of these drops can enhance the effects of other types.

     

    For other patients, laser or traditional surgery is required to lower eye pressure. Common surgeries include:

    • Nd: YAG Laser Cyclophotocoagulation (YAG CP) - For patients with severe glaucoma damage who have not been helped by other surgeries. The ciliary body that produces intraocular fluid is destroyed.
    • Argon Laser Trabeculoplasty (ALT) and Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT) - For patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). The trabecular passages are opened to increase fluid drainage. ALT is effective in about 75% of patients, and SLT may be repeated.

    • Filtering Microsurgery (Trabeculectomy) - For patients who have not been helped with laser surgery or medications. A new drainage passage is created by cutting a small hole in the sclera (the white part of the eye) and creating a collection pouch between the sclera and conjunctiva (the outer covering of the eye).

    • Tube Shunt Surgery - May be recommended for patients with neovascular glaucoma, failed trabeculectomy or susceptibility to developing scar tissue. A thin, flexible tube with a silicone pouch is inserted in the eye to facilitate drainage.

    •  Laser Peripheral Iridotomy (LPI) - For patients with narrow-angle glaucoma. A small hole is made in the iris to increase the angle between the iris and cornea and encourage fluid drainage.

      Some cases of glaucoma can be treated conservatively with eye drops. Eye drops are used to reduce fluid production in the front of the eye or to help drain excess fluid, but can lead to redness, stinging, irritation or blurry vision. Patients should tell their doctor about any allergies they have to minimize the risk of side effects.

     
    What Can I do to Prevent Glaucoma

    Currently, regular eye exams are the best form of prevention against significant glaucoma damage.

    Early detection and careful, lifelong treatment can maintain vision in most people. In general, a check for glaucoma should be done:

     


    ·         Before age 40, every two to four years
    ·         From age 40 to age 54, every one to three years
    ·         From age 55 to 64, every one to two years
    ·         Are over the age of 60
    ·         African Americans over the age of 40
    ·         Have a family history of glaucoma
    ·         Have poor vision
    ·         Have diabetes
    ·         After age 65, every six to 12 months

    Anyone with high risk factors should be tested every year or two after age 35. Those at higher risk include people of African descent, people with diabetes, and people with a family history of glaucoma. You are at increased risk if you have a parent or brother or sister with glaucoma.

    Diagnosing Glaucoma

    The doctor also can diagnose patients who already have glaucoma by observing their nerve damage or visual field loss. The following tests, all of which are painless, may be part of this evaluation. Tonometry determines the pressure in the eye by measuring the tone or firmness of its surface. While some patients may experience symptoms from glaucoma as the disease progresses, others do not learn that they have the condition until they undergo a routine eye exam. There are several different exams performed to diagnose glaucoma, including a visual field and visual acuity test. 

    These tests measure peripheral vision and how well patients can see at various distances. Other tests may also be performed, such as tonometry to measure the pressure inside the eye and the thickness of the cornea.

    To learn more about our Glacoma Treatment,
    Please Contact Us at (301) 589-7474 today to schedule an appointment.

  • Pterygium

     

     

    Pterygium (Surfer's Eye) most often refers to a benign growth of the conjunctiva. A pterygium commonly grows from thenasal side of the conjunctiva. It is usually present in the palpebral fissure. It is associated with and thought to be caused by ultraviolet-light exposure (e.g., sunlight), low humidity, and dust. The predominance of pterygia on the nasal side is possibly a result of the sun's rays passing laterally through the cornea, where it undergoes refraction and becomes focused on the limbic area. Sunlight passes unobstructed from the lateral side of the eye, focusing on the medial limbus after passing through the cornea. On the contralateral (medial) side, however, the shadow of the nose medially reduces the intensity of sunlight focused on the lateral/temporal limbus.

    Pterygium is a benign growth of the conjunctiva, which is the lining of the white part of the eye. It often grows into the cornea, which covers the iris, or the colored part of the eye. A pterygium usually begins at the nasal side of the eye. It can be different colors, including red, pink, white, yellow or gray

     

    Causes

     

    Although the causes of pterygium are not entirely known, it is believed to be caused mainly by exposure to UV light. Another suspected risk is living in a dry, dusty, windy environment. People who live near the equator or play water sports such as surfing and fishing may be more likely to develop pterygium. Prolonged exposure to these conditions causes the conjunctiva to thicken and the eye to become red and irritated. Collagen in the eye begins to deteriorate, and the eye weakens.

     

    Studies show that there may also be a genetic predisposition to pterygium, with a higher prevalence in men than in women.

      

     

     

    Treatment

    In most mild cases of pterygium, artificial tears can be used to reduce dryness and irritation.

    For patients with severe cases whose vision has been affected, different types of surgery are available. Surgery is the only way to definitively remove a pterygium, but it is not a perfect solution; it requires long-term follow-up, and there is a risk that the pterygium will grow back.  Two of the main types of procedures performed to treat pterygium are:

    Conjunctival auto-grafting is a safe and effective technique that surgically removes a pterygium. In this procedure, the pterygium is removed along with the tissue covering the sclera (conjunctiva). Tissue is removed from the inside of the patient's upper eyelid and replaces the bare sclera.

    Amniotic membrane transplantation is another safe and effective pterygium removal procedure. Tissue is removed from the inner layer of the placenta and used to reconstruct the surface of the eye. This type of graft encourages healing and reduces swelling.

     

    If the pterygium persists after surgery, or to minimize the risk of the pterygium recurring, a radiation treatment called strontium plaque therapy may be recommended. Radioactive strontium produces beta particles that penetrate the cornea and prevent the regrowth of blood vessels that develop as the pterygium returns.

     

    Signs of Symptoms  

    Symptoms of pterygium include dryness, redness, irritation, inflammation and tearing. In more severe cases, the pterygium may grow over the pupil and limit vision.

    Preventions  

    Sunglasses that block UV rays, particularly sunglasses that provide side coverage, are a good means of protection against pterygium. Wearing a hat with a brim to block sunlight is also helpful. In hot, dry climates, artificial tears (eye drops) should be used to help lubricate the eyes.


     

    To learn more about our   Pterygium , 
    Please Contact Us at (301) 589-7474 today to schedule an appointment.

  • TORIC Lens
    Toric Lens 

    Intraocular lenses are used to correct vision problems during cataract surgery by replacing the old, damaged lens with an artificial lens that clears up and corrects vision, often leaving patients with little to no dependence on glasses. While cataract surgery corrects cloudy lenses, it still leaves patients with astigmatism with distorted vision. 

    Toric IOLs are specially designed to correct astigmatism along with overall vision during cataract surgery, offering complete vision correction. Before Toric IOLs, people with astigmatism would need to undergo corneal refractive surgery after their lenses were implanted, or would remain dependent on glasses or contact lenses. The advanced Toric IOLs correct the imbalance caused by an irregular cornea shape in patients with astigmatism. There are several different types of FDA-approved Toric IOLs, including AcrySof® Toric Lenses, which can correct up to three diopters of astigmatism.

    The risks of a Toric IOL include poor vision as a result of the lens rotating out of position, although this risk exists with any type of intraocular lens. Toric IOLs are considered safe for most patients with astigmatism and are the only solution to correct vision problems associated with both cataracts and astigmatism. Talk to your doctor to learn more about these lenses and find out if you can enjoy the benefits of Toric IOLs

     

     

    To learn more about our TORIC Lens,
    Please Contact Us at (301) 589-7474 today to schedule an appointment.

  • Glasses
    Glasses
    More than 140 million people in the United States wear eyeglasses. Eyeglasses improve vision by adjusting the way the eyes bend and focus light. Ideally, light rays are refracted (bent) as they pass through the cornea so that they focus on the retina in the back of the eye. In a healthy eye, this means that objects can be seen clearly. However, many people’s corneas have a shallow or steep curvature which causes light rays to focus in front of or behind the retina. Objects may then appear blurry at certain distances or at all distances. Glasses can correct these refractive errors.

    Prescriptions are measured for each eye so patients can enjoy optimal vision clarity, usually 20/20. Eyewear may be used for certain activities, such as reading for farsighted (hyperopic) patients and driving or watching television for nearsighted (myopic) patients, or may be worn at all times. Eyewear may be used for certain activities, such as reading for farsighted (hyperopic) patients and driving or watching television for nearsighted (myopic) patients, or may be worn at all times.

    Regular eye exams test for the development and progression of refractive errors and help your doctor provide a proper prescription if eyeglasses are needed. Exams are also an invaluable tool in the early detection of eye disease.

     

    To learn more about our Glasses,
    Please Contact Us at (301) 589-7474 today to schedule an appointment.

  • Optical Shop

    In addition to the comprehensive ophthalmology services provided at American Eye Care Center our practice also features an optical shop with a wide array of eyeglass frames and contact lenses to suit every and budget. We offer patients frames from many elite designers, as well as stylish yet affordable alternatives. We also carry a full line of frames for children and teens.

     

    Our convenient onsite location also eliminates the hassle of having to take your prescription to another location in  order to fill your vision correction needs. 

    In addition to eyeglasses and contact lenses, we also provide sunglasses, sports glasses, goggles and other forms of safety and athletic eyewear. When visiting our optical shop, patients will be seen by one of our experienced optometrists, who will help you decide which type of glasses or contacts are best for you. Once you make your decision, the optometrist will fit you for your chosen frames or contacts to ensure that you receive the best possible results from your vision correction from a practice you trust.

    To learn more about our optical shop, call us today at ( 301-589-7474 / 703-820-0804 or stop in to see the wide array of products we currently offer.

    To learn more about our Optical Shop,
    Please Contact Us at (301) 589-7474 today to schedule an appointment.

Our Services