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Chalazion Surgery is normally performed by an ophthalmologist . This type of surgery is a simple procedure that is generally performed as a day operation, and the person does not need to remain in the hospital for further medical care. Chalazion removal surgery is performed under local or general anesthesia. Commonly, general anesthesia is administered in children to make sure they stay still and no injury to the eye occurs. Local anesthesia is used in adults and it is applied with a small injection into the eyelid. The discomfort of the injection is minimized with the help of an anesthetic cream, which is applied locally. The chalazion may be removed in two ways, depending on the size of cyst. Relatively small chalazia are removed through a small cut at the back of the eyelid. The surgeon lifts the eyelid so he or she can access the back of its surface and makes an incision of approximately 3 mm just on top of the chalazion. The lump is then removed, and pressure is applied for a few minutes to stop any oozing of blood that may occur because of the operation. Surgery of small chalazia does not require stitches, as the cut is at the back of the eyelid and therefore the cut cannot be seen, and the cosmetic result is excellent. Larger chalazia are removed through an incision in front of the eyelid. Larger chalazia usually push on the skin of the eyelid, and this is the main reason why doctors prefer removing them this way. The incision is not usually larger than 3 mm and it is made on top of the chalazion. The lump is removed and then pressure is applied on the incision to prevent oozing. This type of surgery is closed with very fine stitches. They are hardly visible and are usually removed within a week after the surgery has been performed. Although chalazia are rarely dangerous, it is common to send the chalazion or part of it to a laboratory to screen for cancer. When surgery for a chalazion is considered, patients who take aspirin or any other blood-thinning medications are advised to stop taking them one week prior to the procedure as they may lead to uncontrollable bleeding. There are several tests taken prior the surgery to make sure the patient is in good condition for the operation. In rare cases, patients are kept overnight in the hospital after chalazion surgery. This includes cases in which complications occurred and the patient needs to be closely monitored. In most cases however, patients are able to go home after the operation has ended. The recovery process is easy and quite fast. Most patients experience some very minor discomfort in the eye, which can be easily controlled by taking painkilling medication. Patients are, however, recommended to avoid getting water in the eye for up to 10 days after surgery. They may wash, bathe, or shower, but they must be careful to keep the area dry and clean. Makeup may be worn after at least one month post-operatively. Patients are recommended to not wear contact lenses in the affected eye for at least eight weeks to prevent infections and potential complications. Commonly, patients receive eye drops to prevent infection and swelling in the eye and pain medication to help them cope with the pain and discomfort in the eyelid and eye. One can use paracetamol (acetominophen) rather than aspirin to control the pain. Also, after surgery, a pad and protective plastic shield are used to apply pressure on the eye in order to prevent leakage of blood after the operation; this may be removed 6 to 8 hours after the procedure. People who undergo chalazion surgery are normally asked to visit their eye surgeon for post-op follow-up three to four weeks after surgery has been performed. They may start driving the day after surgery and they may return to work in one or two days. Chalazion surgery is a safe procedure and complications occur very seldomly. Serious complications that require another operation are also very rare. Among potential complications, there is infection, bleeding, or the recurrence of the chalazion.

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